Business Expenses

How to pay business expenses and earn credit card rewards points

How to pay business expenses and earn credit card rewards points

As all business owners know, doing business costs a lot of money. 

Even after you have set up a business, there are ongoing costs left, right and centre.

Insurance, licences and permits, new equipment upgrades, new machinery, new cars, staff training and education, office supplies and software. 

The list goes on and on. 

Often, many of these ongoing expenses are tax deductible. 

But what if you could also turn them into First or Business Class flights to your choice of destination around the world?

With pay.com.au, you might just be able to. 

We are a payment platform that allows you to pay all of your business expenses with a points-earning rewards credit card.

With low fees and a simple and easy-to-use interface, pay.com.au can help you do business better.

You could be reaping the rewards and jetting off to Japan in no time.

What if my providers and suppliers don’t allow credit card payments? 

A lot of invoices from providers and suppliers for business expenses don’t mention the ability to pay by credit card.

They will often only take payment by direct deposit, or will sometimes accept credit card payments with the addition of exuberant fees. 

Not to worry. 

With pay.com.au, you can still pay all of your business expenses with a business credit card or charge card and earn points as well as enjoying interest-free periods that apply.

We will also charge you the lowest processing fees on the market – as little as 0.62% after potential tax savings.

It is simple: you pay us using a credit card and we will pay your provider or supplier. 

This way, your business can benefit from up to 55 days interest free on payments and earn an enormous amount of credit card or frequent flyer points in the process.

How long does it take for providers and suppliers to receive the funds?

Great question – and an important one. 

You do not want to be making late payments and putting suppliers and providers offside. 

That can lead to problems and even cutting off of services. 

However, the timing between a credit card payment made by you for business expenses through pay.com.au and receipt by the payee is typically only T+2 days.

Settlement processes of the card schemes and banks largely dictate this time, however we are working on implementing a same-day payment solution in the future.

In the meantime, it’s worth remembering you can enjoy up to 55 days interest free by paying business expenses with a credit card. 

So even if you are experiencing some temporary cash flow issues, it has never been easier to pay your bills early.

How many points can you earn paying business expenses with a credit card?

This really depends on the size of your business and, therefore, the size of your business expenses bills. 

However, what we can tell you is that with the right business credit card you can earn up to 1.25 points per dollar spent on business expenses with pay.com.au

At that rate, just $66,500 of business expenses payments could land you a one-way Business Class flight on Qantas to terrific Tokyo.

Don’t have a high points-earning business credit card? 

Sign up to one of our well-priced subscription services and we can even help you pick the best card for your business to maximise your rewards.

We can even help you find and book the sometimes elusive First Class and Business Class rewards seats to help get you on your way to a well-deserved holiday.

What else can you use pay.com.au to pay for?

We don’t just allow businesses to make credit card payments for business expenses to suppliers and providers.

We can also process payments to contractors and consultants or assist in making rent payments. 

You can even use our service to make payments for employee superannuation.

How do I sign up?

It’s easy.

Just head to pay.com.au and follow the prompts to sign your business up.

You too could soon be joining our growing number of very happy customers flying at the pointy end of the plane.

Author: Chris Cavanagh